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Samsung Galaxy Note III to have new design

Published by on Apr 16th, 2013, 6 Comments

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Well, well, well… what do we have here? Is it possible that the big shots at Samsung have finally started to listen to criticism? It may well be that the newest iteration of the Note family will not follow design queues from the Galaxy S4 (and almost every other high-end Galaxy device), but better materials like metals.

This comes from our reliable friends over at SamMobile who really has the knack of hitting the nail on the head when it comes to Samsung leaks and rumours. It looks like Samsung saw how successful the launch of the HTC One was and started to become a bit “worried” about the design and build quality of the mobile devices.

We absolutely adore the HTC One and is currently busy with a review (so check back for that soon), and we think it’s probably the best looking Android smartphone ever. To quote my colleague reviewing the device, dare we say it, “prettier than the iPhone.” The HTC One is fully made from aluminium, and not cheap polycarbonate plastic like on many other devices.

Samsung have been using the same design aesthetic for about 18 months now, so it is high time for a change. With the introduction of the Galaxy S4, people started blaming Samsung over the use of the same plastic.

According to the insider, they will not use guidelines from the S4, and have a more premium build. It seems Samsung wanted to do that with the S4 as well, and the prototype metal design was very popular internally, but Samsung couldn’t mass-produce it in time for launch and had to revert to plastic.

We truly hope this is a new phase of the Galaxy evolution, and Samsung will finally produce the top notch built devices we have wanted for some time.

Comments

  • http://www.facebook.com/Scipio.Africanuss Anton Lange

    I keep reading about “premium” feel. Does it really matter? I’ve had my s3 for a year now, dropped it twice (Once the screen shattered) yet not a single scratch on the plastic.

    What matters to most people is the inside. The s4 boasts a much better Camera and came out tops in most bench-mark tests.

    But it obviously depends on the user. Although having played around with a lot of android devices, the s- and note range remains the best user experience. The HTC Onex is a bigger phone with a smaller screen than the s4, with no off-screen inputs apart from the volume bar.

  • Theunis Jansen van Rensburg

    You’re exactly right in saying it depends on the user. That’s exactly why Samsung have decided to go with better materials, because more and more people (the majority, according to some) are asking for better built phones. The Xperia Z, for example, is nearly indestructible, and that’s what people wanted.

    Once again, the user experience depends on the person, but I (and I’m by no means alone) hate the Touchwiz UI Samsung have been using, even though their phones have some useful features. And I do mean SOME, because most are absolute gimmicks.

    But in the end, to each his own. If I could choose any Android device out now (or soon), it would without a doubt be the HTC One. We are busy testing it, and it would definitely be my first choice.

  • Andrew Nieuwmeyer

    This perception that somehow a metal case and a sealed battery is better is irrational, the screen will always be the weak point. The plastic on my S2 has been exceptional and hasn’t shown any wear even though I often rip it off. I like the capability to swap batteries if necessary especially on overnight hikes. Carrying spare batteries is far lighter than any other solution. I hope they don’t feel the need to give into iPhone marketing and customer pressure that a sealed un-userfriendly package is somehow better.

  • http://www.facebook.com/shakir.eddericks Shakir Eddericks

    i have the note 2, the Build quality is poor

  • Theunis Jansen van Rensburg

    The Samsung Galaxy Mega has a sealed case, so no battery swapping there.

  • Theunis Jansen van Rensburg

    Nevermind, Engadget made a mistake on their report.

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